Category Archives: General

A Berkshire Lad Revisited

A Wolseley helmet provenanced to Private Frederick G. Rance of the 1st Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment. This helmet was manufactured by Percy Ayses & Co. (Author’s collection)

A Wolseley helmet provenanced to Private Frederick G. Rance of the 1st Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment. This helmet was manufactured by Percy Ayses & Co. (Author’s collection)

Last year I wrote a companion article to this one, A Berkshire Lad, but have in the last week been contacted by the family of Pte. Frederick G. Rance. I sensed the import and could not but return the helmet to the family to complement the other memorabilia which they have preserved. Continue reading

The British Four Panel Colonial Helmet

An example of a Colonial Pattern helmet with four panels rather than the more usual and authorized six panels. This example is to an Other Rank of the Queen’s Royal Regiment (West Surrey). (Photo courtesy Roland Gruschka)

An example of a Colonial Pattern helmet with four panels rather than the more usual and authorized six panels. This example is to an Other Rank of the Queen’s Royal Regiment (West Surrey). (Photo courtesy Roland Gruschka)

The 1st Battalion West Surrey was stationed in Malta in 1892 and it appears that this type of helmet was not uncommon in Mediterranean stations for the British Army. However, the Dress Regulations of 1894 state that puggarees were to be worn in such stations as India, Bermuda, Ceylon, Hong Kong, Egypt, the Straits Settlements, West Indies, Mauritius, Malta, West Coast of Africa and Cyprus and that the full Home Service pattern helmet plate was to be worn at other stations, i.e. those where the puggaree was not authorized. There was a term “Mediterranean Order” which translated to no puggaree but full helmet plate and it appears that the cork ventilation was also a feature of this “order.” In 1899 puggarees were authorised for all stations abroad. Continue reading

Henry James Frampton, CSI, CIE, MC, ICS

The Collector, Madras Presidency, c1905. 1

The Collector, Madras Presidency, c1905. 1

Henry James Frampton was born in August 1897, at South Stoneham, Hampshire, first son of Henry Manwell Frampton (plasterer) and Mary Frampton. He served with distinction in the First World War and joined the Indian Civil Service (I.C.S.) in 1921. Continue reading

Sun Helmets in the London Guards Museum

Later Victorian Era uniforms and sun helmets at the Guards Museum

The Guards Museum in London chronicles the story of the five regiments of Foot Guards  (the Grenadier Guards, Coldstream Guards, Scots Guards, Irish Guards, and Welsh Guards). Its collection includes many fine examples of military sun helmets. Continue reading

Sun Helmets of the Philippine Commonwealth Army

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One somewhat forgotten sun helmet pattern was that used by the Philippine Commonwealth Army. Issued just months before America’s entry into the Second World War, these seemed based on the pressed fiber helmets used by the United States but offered a larger rear brim. And instead of pressed fiber these were made of pressed coconut fiber!

Reportedly used an a substitute for the campaign or “Montana Peak” hat, these were widely used during the Japanese invasion of the Philippines.

Peter Suciu

The Story of the Sun Helmet Continues

While things have slowed down a bit we remain committed to reporting on the history of tropical headdress.

MilitarySunHelmets.com is grateful to have run a special article by author Nick Komiya on the development and evolution of the Japanese sun helmet.  We thank Nick for allowing us to republish this detailed study on the Japanese tropical helmets, and we once again extend our thanks to Benny Bough, Pedro Soares Branco, Enzo Faraone, Dr. Chris Flaherty, Roland Gruschka, James A. Holt, Clive Law, Shea Megale, Piero Pompili and Michael S. for their excellent contributions to this site.

We’re always interested to hear from our readers.

This story won’t end anytime soon.

Peter Suciu
January 2017